Get to Know a Scienceblogger: Patrice Brassard

Dr Patrice Brassard of Le Physiologiste

Do you ever wonder how people get into online science communication?  I certainly hope so, because over the coming weeks Peter and I will be introducing a new series interviewing science communicators about their experiences promoting science using social media.  These individuals cover a broad range of academic disciplines, and we hope that they will be a useful source of info and motivation for others who are considering moving into social media, or for those who are already online but simply looking for some new ideas.  If you would like to share your own experiences communicating science through social media feel free to do so in the comments, or to introduce yourself to us via Twitter or email (saunders [dot] travis [at] gmail [dot] com).

Our first interview comes from Dr Patrice Brassard, an assistant professor of Kinesiology at Université Laval in Quebec city, Canada. His main research interests are the integration of cardiopulmonary and cerebrovascular physiology in patients with diabetes at rest and during exercise, and the impact of mental work on the cardiovascular system in healthy subjects.  His blog is titled Le Physiologiste and for the past two weeks he has also been guest-posting at the blog network Scientopia.

 

1. What is the general subject of your blog?

Initially, the general subject of Le Physiologiste was supposed to be…physiology :-) . However, I started by sharing my experiences as a junior faculty member. It is important to mention that when I began to read science blogs, I was very interested in these kinds of posts from bloggers sharing similar research and teaching issues than mine. The other collaborators at Le Physiologiste are graduate students and are sharing their experiences as well (in English and French). A couple of weeks ago, we finally decided to include posts where we are actually discussing physiology, mostly in French.

I would like this blog to become a place for graduate students, researchers and professors in physiology to debate about hot physiology topics.

 

2. What was your primary reason for starting a blog?

The primary reason for starting my blog was that, to my knowledge, there are no valuable French blogs/websites discussing published literature in integrative/exercise physiology…however, I soon noticed that it would be easier to start blogging in English, because I was already exchanging with bloggers in that language.

I still have that goal of discussing and debating physiology research in French…Our blog remains a work in progress for the moment!


3. How often do you post, and roughly how much time goes into each post?

More >

Knowledge Dissemination: blogging vs peer review

Travis’ Note: Today’s post is from Dr David J Phipps of ResearchImpact, a Canadian knowledge-exchange network.  The original post can be found on Mobilize This!, the ResearchImpact blog.  Thanks to David for allowing us to cross-post his article here.

In an age of self publishing – including blogs, videos, and other Web-based media – why do we still seek to publish in traditional academic peer-reviewed journals? Vanity.

ResearchImpact-York published two academic papers in 2009. In 2010 we had one in press, two submitted, and one just rejected for a second time, from the same journal. Since our first post on May 30, 2008, ResearchImpact has published 206 blogs on Mobilize This!, an average of 6 or 7 each month.

Here’s a comparison of blogging and peer-reviewed publishing: More >

Scienceblogging Roundup: March 27-April 2

While we post lengthy discussions here on Science of Blogging, there are many research updates, news stories, videos, etc. related to science communication that we come across on a daily basis that never grace the pages of the blog. Most of these mini-stories we share with our followers on Twitter, and we encourage those of you with active Twitter accounts to communicate with us there to get real-time updates of all the stuff we are discussing (Follow Peter and/or Follow Travis). For those of you who shy away from Twitter, enjoy below the best mini-stories that we came across during the prior week along with links to the original source so that you can follow the full story.

Have a great weekend!
Travis

Top 5 Twitter Etiquette Tips

While I claim to be no expert on Twitter etiquette, I would hope that over the past 2 years of tweeting I have picked up at least a few morsels of useful info.

Whenever I’ve tried to explain how Twitter works, I use the analogy of attending a large party with some potentially important guests in attendance.

Tip #1: How to make a Twitter entrance

As is the case with large parties, you know very few people there. Thus, when you first get there, you want to introduce yourself to as many people as possible.

But you wouldn’t simply enter through the front door holding a megaphone and announce to everyone present: “HELLO I AM JOHN AND I WOULD LIKE TO TALK TO ALL OF YOU!”

That is, you don’t want to just blindly follow hundreds or even thousands of people without really getting to know any of them, and giving them an opportunity to learn something about you.

Most appropriate method would be to introduce yourself to a few people at a time, and to move around the room, slowly building contacts. More >

Scienceblogging Roundup – March 20-26

While we post lengthy discussions here on Science of Blogging, there are many research updates, news stories, videos, etc. related to science communication that we come across on a daily basis that never grace the pages of the blog. Most of these mini-stories we share with our followers on Twitter, and we encourage those of you with active Twitter accounts to communicate with us there to get real-time updates of all the stuff we are discussing (Follow Peter and/or Follow Travis). For those of you who shy away from Twitter, enjoy below the best mini-stories that we came across during the prior week along with links to the original source so that you can follow the full story.

 

  • The story behind Jonathan Eisen’s new PLoSONE paper <== A terrific example of how blogs can be used to provide supplemental information on a paper, as well as performing science communication and answering questions from both the media and from the general public, in a way that press releases just cannot.  This blog post perfectly illustrates why scientists who are serious about science communication should be blogging (Phylogenomics)
  • What is the most common negative social-networking experience?  Spurned friend requests.  (Thoughts of a Neo-Academic)
  • What is your blogging style? (Skepticemia)
  • Want to blog but can’t get up the courage to put yourself out there?  Problogger has some great tips on ways to get over blogger fright (Problogger)
  • Want to recruit top talent to your organization with your online job ad?  Then make sure that your website combats industry stereotypes (Thoughts of a Neo-Academic)
  • Open Lab 2010 is now up for sale! <== Open Lab is an annual anthology of the the best science blogging on the web.  If you’re looking for ways to communicate science online more effectively, the posts in this book are a great starting point (A Blog Around The Clock)
  • What is healthy?  Learning through blogging. <== Penny Deck looks at how a class blog has helped her undergraduate students learn and improve their critical thinking skills (Feedback Solutions for Obesity)
  • Finally, kudos to everyone who has started weekend roundups of their own!  So far I have seen roundups from Nutritional Blogma, Feedback Solutions for Obesity, Voyages Around My Camera and Weight Maven, and have come across a few interesting links as a result – so they’re working!  Let me know if I’ve missed any.  If you’re considering starting a roundup of your own, check out my post from earlier this year explaining why roundup posts are an easy way to help your readers and grow your blog.

Those are the posts that caught our eye this week!  I should mention that I found many of today’s articles through Researchblogging.org, which I have outlined previously here (and which I can’t recommend highly enough).  Have a great weekend!

Travis

Scienceblogging Roundup – March 6-12

While we post lengthy discussions here on Science of Blogging, there are many research updates, news stories, videos, etc. related to science communication that we come across on a daily basis that never grace the pages of the blog. Most of these mini-stories we share with our followers on Twitter, and we encourage those of you with active Twitter accounts to communicate with us there to get real-time updates of all the stuff we are discussing (Follow Peter and/or Follow Travis). For those of you who shy away from Twitter, enjoy below the best mini-stories that we came across during the prior week along with links to the original source so that you can follow the full story.

  • Arsenic DNA author dumps peer review, gives a presentation at TED (Neuron Culture)
  • Could Tumblr be the ideal way to spread scientific info online? (It’s Okay to Be Smart)
  • What is worth more money – a share on Twitter or Facebook? (Social Media Today)
  • The trouble with bibliographies (Gobbledygook)
  • Culture clash: journalism’s ideology vs blog culture (Online Journalism Blog)
  • Preventing obesity in 2011 <– not explicitly related to the science of blogging, but includes an example of a Slideshare presentation, which is a great way to turn lectures into online webinars (Obesity Panacea)

Those are the posts that caught our eye this week.  Have a great weekend!

Travis